STATE NRM OFFICE

Natural Resource Management in Western Australia

Regional groups

There are six regional natural resource management (NRM) groups in Western Australia, operating within each of the State's seven NRM regions. These regions are based on catchments or bioregions and were established as part of the Natural Heritage Trust in 2002 to 2004.

Regional NRM groups work in partnership with all tiers of government, regional organisations, industry, landowners, researchers, environmental and community groups. They provide a community leadership role in their region, mobilise regional effort and ensure priority needs are addressed. They also build on government investment by leveraging private investment and volunteer activities and ensuring collaboration across established networks.

Each regional group has developed a regional strategy and investment plan that address significant NRM issues within their region. The plans incorporate environmental, social, and economic factors.

The NRM Regional Leaders Group represents the seven regional groups in Western Australia.

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Avon

Avon regionWheatbelt Natural Resource Management Inc. is responsible for coordinating natural resource management efforts in the Avon region which covers 12 million hectares (ha) of the Western Australian Wheatbelt.

Almost 63 per cent of the region has been released for agriculture and associated land uses. Principal land uses include annual dryland cropping (mainly wheat) and grazing (mainly sheep).

Native vegetation in the region is recognised internationally for its species richness, much of which is endemic. More than 6 per cent of the region is reserved for nature conservation purposes and there are over 50 000 remnants of native vegetation on private land, mostly less than 20 ha in size.

Extensive clearing of natural vegetation for agriculture has caused broad degradation problems. However, the region continues to maintain profitable farm enterprises, particularly through wheat exports.

Most surface and groundwater is unsuitable for domestic or farm use due to high salinity levels.

Avon

Wheatbelt Natural Resource Management Inc. is the regional body for the Avon NRM Region which covers 12 million hectares (ha) of the Western Australian Wheatbelt.

Swan

City swansPerth Region NRM is responsible for coordinating natural resource management efforts in the Swan region which covers an area of more than 770 000 hectares. The region incorporates the Swan and Canning River catchments and extends three nautical miles offshore and includes islands such as Rottnest.

The region includes the Western Australian capital city of Perth, home to 1.5 million people. The population of Perth is placing pressures on natural resources, including dwindling water resources for residential and industrial use, and clearing of native vegetation for urban development.

Perth Region NRM is keenly focused on encouraging corporate support for natural resource management. A program involving Alcoa World Alumina Australia and the Swan River Trust (Swan Alcoa Landcare Program) has been established as a model for corporate sponsorship.

Swan

Perth Region NRM is the regional body for the Swan NRM Region which covers an area of more than 770 000 hectares. The region incorporates the Swan and Canning River catchments and extends three nautical miles offshore and includes islands such as Rottnest.

South West

South westThe South West Catchments Council (SWCC) is responsible for coordinating natural resource management efforts in the South West region.

The region covers 5 million hectares, from the fast-growing coastal areas of Mandurah and Busselton to the salinity-threatened wheatbelt areas to the east, and the karri and jarrah forests in the south. Major industries in the region are resource-based, such as mining, agriculture, fishing, forestry, energy and eco-tourism.

The South West region forms a large component of Australia's only internationally-recognised biodiversity hotspot. The region supports significant areas and numbers of Western Australia's endemic flora and fauna. Four wetland systems within the region are also internationally recognised for their high biodiversity value.

South West

The South West Catchments Council (SWCC) is the regional body for the South West NRM Region. The region covers 5 million hectares, from the fast-growing coastal areas of Mandurah and Busselton to the salinity-threatened wheatbelt areas to the east, and the karri and jarrah forests in the south.

South Coast

South Coast RegionSouth Coast Natural Resource Management is the leading regional group for natural resource management on the south coast of Western Australia.

The region covers 6 million hectares of land and stretches three nautical miles out to sea. The area includes all southerly flowing rivers from Walpole in the west to beyond Cape Arid in the east. Some internally drained areas north-east of Albany and north of Esperance are also included in this area. The region is home to just over 57 000 people, with about 20 per cent of the workforce directly employed in agriculture, forestry or fisheries. The coastal towns' populations are thriving while inland towns are declining in numbers.

The region is renowned for spectacular landscapes including tall forests, the southern coastline and offshore islands, all southern WA's mountain peaks, and many inlets, estuaries, waterways and wetlands. It has extremely high levels of biodiversity, with more than 20 per cent of WA's floristic diversity and numerous threatened flora and fauna species.

South Coast

South Coast Natural Resource Management is the regional body for the South Coast NRM Region. The region covers 6 million hectares of land and stretches three nautical miles out to sea.

Northern Agriculture

Northern Agricultural RegionThe Northern Agricultural Catchments Council (NACC) is responsible for coordinating natural resource management in the northern agricultural region.

The region covers 7 million hectares of land, extending from Gingin in the south to Kalbarri in the north, and out into the Wheatbelt of Western Australia. There are four sub-regions: Greenough, Yarra Yarra, Moore and West Midlands.

The region is home to a population of 60 000, half of which is centered in the Geraldton-Greenough area. In general, the population of small inland towns in this region is declining, while coastal areas are experiencing rapid growth.

Some of the critical management issues include water quality and quantity, control of introduced pests, soil quality and production levels, and loss of biodiversity. The region is notable as a hotspot of biodiversity at both national and global scales. This is because of extraordinarily high levels of biodiversity, large numbers of rare and threatened animals and plants, and continuing loss of biodiversity through clearing, disease and other threats.

Northern Agriculture

The Northern Agricultural Catchments Council (NACC) is the regional body for the Northern Agricultural NRM Region. The region covers 7 million hectares of land, extending from Gingin in the south to Kalbarri in the north, and out into the Wheatbelt of Western Australia.

Rangelands

Kimberley Rangelands RegionRangelands NRM Western Australia is responsible for coordinating natural resource management efforts in the vast Rangelands region. The Rangelands region covers approximately 1.85 million square kilometres, representing 90 per cent of Western Australia's land mass and more than 75 per cent of the coastline. The region includes the Kimberley, Pilbara, Gascoyne-Murchison and Goldfields-Nullarbor areas, and supports a population of 133 000 people.

The region comprises mainly pastoral and mining interests and to a lesser extent cropping. Pastoral leases cover 98 million hectares, stretching from the Kimberley in the north to the Great Australian Bight in the south. It also contains many areas of special significance to the Aboriginal community.

A significant conservation estate exists involving national parks, nature reserves, conservation parks, marine parks and reserves and two World Heritage-listed areas. The region contains wide biological diversity, including many threatened species of plants, animals and ecological communities such as the Western barred bandicoot, Loggerhead turtle and Freshwater sawfish. The region includes some of Western Australia's last wild rivers, such as the Thompson and Doubtful rivers.

Rangelands

Rangelands NRM Western Australia is responsible for coordinating natural resource management efforts in the vast Rangelands region. The Rangelands region covers approximately 1.85 million square kilometres, representing 90 per cent of Western Australia's land mass and more than 75 per cent of the coastline.

 

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2014 Community grants Thank you to everyone that applied!

We received 225 applications in total - worth more than $6.9 million. Applicants pledged a further $12.7 million towards the delivery of projects in cash and in-kind contributions. This equates to $19.6 million worth of activity for the protection of WA’s environment!

Page last updated on Tuesday, 1 July 2014